Trail: Danes Dyke - Picture Challenge

Are you up to the challenge??
The historic photographs on this trail were taken at Danes Dyke, but can you tell whereabouts exactly?
Walk the short trail then use ‘camera view’ for each trailpoint to explore the nature reserve and see if you can solve where each photograph may have been taken…
…Then, take a modern-day snap, share it to @ERArchives on Facebook / Twitter, or email it to archives.service@eastriding.gov.uk for a chance to win a prize!
See our ‘Picture Challenge’ blog page for details.

(Always be careful of your surroundings when using the app, and take care not to endanger yourself and others. Children must be accompanied by an adult).

In association with Countryside Access Team (East Riding of Yorkshire Council).

(in the event of intermittent data signal, it’s recommended that you preview each trail image before you set off, so they are cached to your device and will load more quickly).

Natural Heritage

See the ‘Picture Challenge’ page on our blog for details of how to enter.

The nature reserve here at Danes Dyke is a unique sea, cliff, and woodland environment that is protected as a Special Site of Scientific Interest, and is also a Scheduled Ancient Monument, making it a rare treasure of nature and heritage combined.

Open ‘camera view’ for this 1913 image as you explore the dyke and see if you can find the spot where this image was taken.  Take a modern-day snap and share it on Facebook / Twitter (remember to tag @ERArchives ) for a chance to win a prize! Or email it to archives.service@eastriding.gov.uk  

Now you’ve viewed all of the images, explore the nature reserve for yourself to try and find where these historic photos were taken, and enter our Picture Challenge!   

Remember to go to Visit Hull and East Yorkshire for more information about Danes Dyke and what it has to offer!

Lady of the Manor

See the ‘Picture Challenge’ page on our blog for details of how to enter.

The Lady of the Manor of Flamborough, Frances Elizabeth Cotterell-Dormer, used to live in a grand house where the car park is now situated.  It was built in 1873 but demolished in 1953.

Open ‘camera view’ for this 1911 image as you explore the dyke and see if you can find the spot where this image was taken.  Take a modern-day snap and share it on Facebook / Twitter (remember to tag @ERArchives ) for a chance to win a prize! Or email it to archives.service@eastriding.gov.uk

Trees

See the ‘Picture Challenge’ page on our blog for details of how to enter.

In addition to the exotic parkland trees, there are others that now grow naturally in this region: Ash, Elm, Sycamore, Beech, and Lime.

Open ‘camera view’ for this 1912 image as you explore the dyke and see if you can find the spot where this image was taken.  Take a modern-day snap and share it on Facebook / Twitter (remember to tag @ERArchives ) for a chance to win a prize! Or email it to archives.service@eastriding.gov.uk

Wildlife

See the ‘Picture Challenge’ page on our blog for details of how to enter.

Danes Dyke was designated a Local Nature Reserve in 2002, giving recognition of its wildlife value and importance to the local community.

Open ‘camera view’ for this 1913 image as you explore the dyke and see if you can find the spot where this image was taken.  Take a modern-day snap and share it on Facebook / Twitter (remember to tag @ERArchives ) for a chance to win a prize! Or email it to archives.service@eastriding.gov.uk

Bronze Age

(Our trail begins at the top of the path leading down into the dyke.  Use ‘View on map’ from the trail’s homepage to reach point ‘1’ and the start of the trail).

See the ‘Picture Challenge’ page on our blog for details of how to enter.

Open ‘camera view’ for this 1906 image as you explore the dyke and see if you can find the spot where this 1906 image was taken.  Take a modern-day snap and share it on Facebook / Twitter (remember to tag @ERArchives ) for a chance to win a prize! Or email it to archives.service@eastriding.gov.uk

‘Danes Dyke’.  Its name hints at the Danes (Vikings) who once invaded the area at the end of the 8th century, but the dyke itself is an ancient ditch or earthwork constructed for defence, and dates at least as far back as the Bronze Age, with arrowheads from that period having been found here.